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Jessamine Martin, Psy.D.

Psychologist Candidate

303-547-3594

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Jessamine Martin, Psy.D.   303-547-3594

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main phone: 303-547-3700

areas of treatment


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attention, focus, ADHD
depression
dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)
emotion regulation
grief & loss
identity
mindfulness
sexual orientation & gender identity
social skills


attention

Difficulty focusing on the task in front of you; feeling lost in longer conversations; easily flustered by unexpected changes in plans or routines; forgetfulness about small details or large events. These are all common experiences for someone struggling with attention or focus. In therapy, I work with you to build useful skills that will help your daily life feel more organized and predictable. We will also explore potential reasons behind some of your forgetfulness, and how emotions may be playing a part. In my assessments, I am less focused on the diagnosis and more interested in exploring your, or your child's, specific struggles and how to improve or resolve them. I will give you personalized recommendations for the skills and methods that may be more helpful for you.

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depression

It's healthy for your emotions to fluctuate between positive and negative throughout the day. However, when your negative emotions start to overwhelm the positive and take up a lot of your attention, that's what we call depression. Usually people think of feelings of hopelessness and sadness--or maybe "negative self-talk" as depression. But, it can impact your daily life in other ways, too. It might be a loss of appetite, not wanting to do your usual hobbies, feeling tired despite getting enough sleep, or even anger or paranoia. We will address any of these ways you experience depression, and identify how to counteract your specific symptoms. Our goal is to help you feel a healthier version or amount of these emotions and feel in control of how to deal with the low moments during the day, and increasing your truly good feelings.

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dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a type of therapy created by psychologist Marsha Linehan in the late 1980s to help people handle distress, and to use mindfulness and acceptance to better cope with their feelings. With DBT, you learn many different types of skills while also learning more about your thoughts and emotions. One skill is to find, understand, and sort out dialectics. A dialectic is when you have two wants and needs that feel like complete opposites, but both are true. A dialectic creates a feeling of tension from being pulled between the two needs. It is when you feel like you should choose one or the other, but you really wish you could have a perfect answer that gives you both. I may use DBT in many ways, depending on what works for you. Identifying and understanding dialectics is a natural part of talking about your thoughts and feelings. I bring in DBT skills, and I invite you to practice and let me know what works and what doesn't. Even though I often use DBT principles, I still stay open to whatever will work best for you and help you reach your goals.

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emotion regulation

Emotions are a huge part of our daily life. Emotions are your mind and body's way of telling what you need and how you're doing. Without fear, you might not know how to back away from danger. Without sadness, you might not know what you need or yearn for. Without anger, you might not be able to protect yourself or someone else. Without joy, we might lose track of why the struggles are all worth it. We are built to feel a lot of different emotions, and each emotion has a reason for being there. For some, however, emotions and mood swings can begin to feel overwhelming, unexpected, or even frightening. As humans, we do not choose which emotions to feel from one moment to the next. However, you can build skills that can help you manage your emotions effectively in the moment. You can find ways to help steer you towards more positive and kind thoughts, and feel more in control of negative moments. With practice and time, you can become more comfortable with both positive and negative moods. Instead of feeling controlled by them, you can learn from them and enjoy them on a deeper level.

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grief & loss

We all experience losses in our own personal way. You might be surprised by how much it has taken over--the intense or unstoppable thoughts and emotions. In our work, I strive to help you accept the ways you experience grief, and have more kind thoughts towards yourself about your own experience. We may help you develop more skills or strengthen your support networks to help you with the loss you are working through. This is often a long healing process, and I can support you through that.

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identity

While rarely the initial reason for seeking therapy, a common contributor to mental or emotional discomfort is a poor sense of self and personal identity. Having a clear idea of who you are, your personal drives, values, and interests can improve your general sense of purpose and satisfaction so much that you notice it every day. To work on your identity development, we search your values and help you identify your personal quirks and features that make you uniquely you. I am an active advocate and ally for minority cultures and identities. Please know that if you are struggling with how you identify with aspects of your cultural heritage, gender identity, sexuality, or political values, I create a safe space where you can air out your thoughts and non-judgmentally explore your emotions and needs. It is through a clear sense of self and identity that we can foster pride and confidence in who we are in the world, and build stronger friendships and relationships.

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mindfulness

Mindlessness is when we are disconnected from our body and core sense of self in the moment. And it is very common in our distraction-filled culture. We are encouraged and rewarded for pushing ourselves and multi-tasking our way to a sense of success and accomplishment. At the same time, you can probably tell how much it costs you. Mindfulness is an approach for finding ways to become reconnected with the present moment, the here-and-now, or simply the "little things" in daily life. It can be the main focus of therapy, or it can be an additional focus on building skills to support your work towards a broader goal. This increased sense of awareness can help improve your acceptance of small moments and comfort with the ambiguity in your daily life. And these skills can be amazingly helpful in a wide variety of settings and situations for the rest of your life.

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sexual orientation & gender identity

The world has changed a lot in the past 20 years: there is so much more we can express about ourselves and our identity. We have queer theory and other ways of seeing people than through heteronormative and binary genders. People are out. People are proud. And, well, it's sometimes not that easy. We still have far to go, and unfortunately many people in the LGBTQ community struggle to find support on their journeys of self-expression. As your therapist and ally, I want to offer a safe space where you can explore your identity, social support, and ways to advocate for yourself and others. I work to remain humble and open to getting to know you and your personal journey wherever you may be in your life and identity. And if gender and sexual orientation are just a part of your identity-not the focus of treatment-you can count on me not to fixate on it.

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social skills

Learning and practicing social skills is not just for kids. At any age, people can feel confused or uncomfortable when talking to others. Having great socials skills can make you feel better about yourself and your relationships. Therapy can be a place where you feel safe talking about social blunders or odd encounters or uncomfortable memories. Together we can help you find ways to feel comfortable and confident in many different social situations. This can take the form of skills related to reading social cues, using empathy in the moment, and knowing what emotions you are feeling in the moment. And, I can help you become more forgiving towards yourself, so that in a moment where you feel like you put your foot in your mouth you can also feel able to recover and move on from it.

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